Oatmeal Stout

Recipes:
8,323
BJCP 2021:
16B
Era:
Traditional
Origin:
🇬🇧 Great Britain
Fermentation:
Top
Color:
Dark
Strength:
Normal
Taste:
Balanced

Profile

Oatmeal Stout is a variant of the classic Sweet Stout style that uniquely incorporates oats into its grain bill for a smoother body and a touch of sweetness. The historical use of oats in brewing is indeed an old tradition, but the specific rendition known as Oatmeal Stout became more recognized during the late 19th and early 20th centuries in England. It was often touted for its health benefits, appealing to a broad range of consumers seeking both nutrition and flavor in their beer. Over time, the popularity of Oatmeal Stouts waned, but the style saw a revival due to the craft beer movement and now enjoys international recognition.

In terms of appearance, this stout presents a rich darkness ranging from deep copper to brown or even entirely black hues. One can expect it to pour with a creamy tan to brown head that is both persistent and inviting. The opacity can be significant due to both the dark grains used and any potential yeast suspended within it, giving it a somewhat opaque quality. An Oatmeal Stout often unfolds with moderate to strong aromas featuring malt-driven characteristics such as coffee, chocolate, or toasted bread notes. These darker malts carry through on the palate as well, balanced nicely by the silkiness imparted by the oats. The oat character does not typically present distinctively in flavor but rather contributes to the overall smoothness of mouthfeel and can add a touch of nutty or grainy complexity if at all perceptible. Not overly hoppy or bitter, this style maintains excellent balance with sweetness thanks to low-to-moderate bitterness and modest hop character which allows for malty richness to prevail without becoming cloying.

Oatmeal Stout retains connections with other styles under the stout umbrella – it shares many features with Sweet Stouts except for its trademark inclusion of oats while differing from Dry Stouts by having less roasted bite and usually being less attenuated (therefore sweeter). When neatly positioned between its kin, it demonstrates how versatility within one family of beers can entice an array of palates seeking different levels of roastiness, dryness, or lush textures brought forth by brewing grains such as barley and oats.

Specifications

Alcohol

Specification
4.2 – 5.9 %

In Database
4.1 < 5.4 < 6.4 %

Bitterness

Specification
25 – 40 IBU

In Database
19 < 31 < 45 IBU

Color

Specification
43 – 79 EBC
22 – 40 SRM

In Database
42 < 69 < 115 EBC
21 < 35 < 59 SRM

Original Extract

Specification
11.2 – 15.8 °P
1.045 – 1.065 OG

In Database
10.6 < 13.7 < 16.5 °P
1.043 < 1.056 < 1.068 OG

Final Gravity

Specification
2.6 – 4.6 °P
1.010 – 1.018 FG

In Database
2.1 < 3.8 < 5.6 °P
1.008 < 1.015 < 1.022 FG

Popularity Over Time

Most Used Yeasts

Most Used Hops

Dosage of Hops

Hop Pairings

Brewing Recipes